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2015-04-07_11-05-58

March 2015 Reigate summary

Reigate March 2015 weather summary

  • Average Temperature 6.9C
  • Tmax 14.4C
  • Tmin -1.9C
  • total rainfall 23.8mm
  • max wind gust 46mph
  • sunshine 143.2 hours

Anticyclonic conditions controlled a good chunk of March bringing a lot of dry weather to Reigate.  Total Reigate March rainfall of 23.8mm is around half of that expected from the long term average for March recorded since 1873.  Whilst March rainfall this year was low it was not outside the “normal range” with mean monthly rainfall for March in South East England being 49.8mm and the mode (most frequently occurring) at a relatively dry 38.7mm.  March 2015 turns out to be the 36th driest year since 1873, the lowest being 1929 with a paltry 2mm of rainfall.  So March 2015 was dry but not super-dry!

With high pressure around March was sunny and not terribly windy, especially through the middle month.  Mid-Month the temperature dipped notably (see top chart) as a slack easterly set up with the high moving over Scandinavia.  It was not a beast from the east because the continent was warm and there was no really cold air available.  The slack conditions finished at the end of March, however, as a significant NW gale blew across the UK.  This broke our daily wind run record at 305.4 miles.  Wind run is the “fetch” or distance that the wind has travelled passing a point during the day.  Imagine a balloon drifting in the wind during the day… how far would it travel? This is the wind run.  The NW wind also turned lorries over on motorways further north, gusting over 70mph in places.  In Reigate the max gust was 46mph, pretty strong but with no leaves on the trees it did not cause damage.

143.2 hours of sunshine in Reigate exceeded the long term average.

March will be remembered for the “deep partial” solar eclipse that crossed much of the UK on 20 March.  Sadly for us in Reigate and much of the SE we saw nothing of it except a gathering gloom and slight dip in temperature.  More on our eclipse observations here: https://rgsweather.com/2015/03/21/reigate-some-eclipse-effects-on-weather/

2015 overall is above the long term CET average but not by much. Nevertheless, as a moderate El Nino is set to start properly this summer it is likely that 2015 will be break more temperature records globally as a hot year overall for the planet.

2015-04-07_11-58-30

All our weather data can be downloaded from the data page here.

MetOffice March summary 

http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/climate/uk/summaries

http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/climate/uk/summaries/2015/march

2015-03-12_21-10-33

February 2015 Reigate weather summary

 

Weather statistics summary for Reigate during February 2015

Average temperature 3.9C (UK 3.5)

Tmax 10.8C 25/02

Tmin -3C 22/02

Total precipitation 59mm

max wind gust 32mph 06/02

February was around the long term average at 4C in Reigate.  The CET stood February at just 0.3C above the long term average.

After an intially cold start to the month the temperature rose.

Overall February came out around average temperature but note the much warmer continent.

2015-03-12_21-58-44

A notable cirrostratus halo occured around moon on 02 Feb and this accompanied by some brief excitement over a snow band moving south down the eastern side of the country.

This band delivered an insignificant snow flurry on 03 Feb, overnight, with  a cm or so of briefly lying snow that melted rapidly during the morning.

Models threatened easterly winds on occasion but this didn’t arise.  In any case Europe and the continent experienced a warmer than average month so the deep continental cold was not available.  In fact after another brief flirt with snow at the beginning of the month, the temperature climbed through the middle of the month with westerly influences with temperatures exceeding 10C overnight on occasions.

Rainfall 58mm was just a little below average and sunshine hours, at 90 hours, was about average.

 

 

 

MetOffice February summary

http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/climate/uk/summaries/2015/february

 

2015-02-04_18-44-20

January 2015 summary for Reigate, Surrey

Average temp 4.5C (UK av 3.7C, CET 1C above long term average)

Tmax 14.7C (12.2C 2014)

Tmin -4.9C (-1.5C 2014)

Total precipitation 69mm  (183mm 2014)

Max wind gust 42mph (52mph Jan 2014)

snowfall was recorded on 3 days, snow lying on 2 mornings

Total sunshine 96 hours (98hrs 2015)

2015-02-04_18-50-532015-02-04_18-50-11

January was mostly under the influence of an occasionally strong westerly and NW airstream with some stormy weather for the NW of the UK but, predictably, Reigate and the SE was sheltered from most of the weather action and our rainfall total was about on the long term average for the South East at 69mm. This was, of course, considerably less than the 183mm rainfall last January 2014!

2015-02-08_20-12-44

Overall, January was just about average temperature in the UK. This average hides the variation though… the start of January was extremely mild with some very warm Tmax temperatures early in the month reaching nearly 15C in Reigate.  The end of January was considerably colder than average although nothing extreme.

The end of January cold snap ran into the first week of February.  During this period Reigate saw temperatures drop modestly below average and we experienced 3 spells of modest wet snowfall, albeit lying snow from night time falls rapidly melted by early morning and the lowest temperatures we a mere -4C.  Reigate experienced one notable but brief “thundersnow” event on the afternoon of 29 Jan. This caused some local traffic disruption.

The cause of our swings in weather a neatly summarised in the mean monthly sea level pressure and 500hPa anomaly chart from the JMA.  Here you can see the building high pressure over the Azores towards Iceland and the low pressure to the North and NE nudging towards Scandinavia.  It is this configuration of building ridge in the Atlantic and LOW over Scandinavia that eventually brought our modified “Arctic blast” through the last week of January.  As is normal for an Arctic airmass the SE of England away from the North Sea coast of Kent rarely sees any prolonged snowfall and this was the case.  An interesting feature developed on the 29/01/2015 within the Arctic airmass: a polar low may have spun up and moved South through the Irish Sea.  This was controversial and not accepted as a true polar low by everyone but it seemed to have many of the characteristics.  A post on this polar low can be found here.

 

The evolution of the January 2015 cold snap was interesting because it was initiated by an unusually cold and unstable NW airstream on the back of a deep low that crossed Scotland.  The NW airstream was unstable enough to bring the thundersnow event to Reigate. Oddly the original NW “blast” from Greenland pushed through so quickly that a lot of polar maritime returning and tropical maritime air was secluded in the low core over Scandinavia.  It was this secluded / occluded warmer airmass that a) probably contributed to the polar low feature and b) modified the Arctic blast and , at least initially, made it much less cold than is usual for such an airmass direction.  It took several days for any truly cold air to reach the SE of England and, even then, 850hPa temps never fell below -6 or -7C.

The CET for January was nearly 1C above average for the long term average, quite a lot more than the MetOffice.  As can be seen from the chart below this January was not exceptionally warm, being moderated by the cold snap at the end of the month.  Only 6 of the last 20 years have come out colder than the long term CET average.

2015-02-08_21-09-03

Globally January was +0.35C above the long term (30 year) average temperature.  The northern hemisphere was +0.55C above the long term average.

2015-02-08_21-10-04

 

http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/climate/uk/summaries/2015/january/regional-values

http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/climate/uk/summaries/2015/january

 

2015-01-03_16-02-42

Reigate 2014 weather report

2014 weather in Reigate, like the rest of England and Wales, broke some records for rainfall and temperature but in quite different ways.  To compare with 2013 visit here.

2015-01-04_10-33-22

South East England JANUARY rainfall 1873-2014

The annual summary chart (top) shows that Reigate had an exceptionally wet start to the year with January being the wettest on record (MetOffice) with over 180mm of rain (see chart above). The annual total rainfall for Reigate was 931.8mm which is above average for the area and well above the 2013 annual rainfall total of 654mm.  The rainfall record that fell in 2014 was for the highest January monthly precipitation total since accurate UK rainfall records began in 1873, exceeding 180mm in Reigate and the SE.  The January rainfall record fell in a winter that will be remembered for being exceptionally stormy in the SE, beginning with St Jude storm in October 2013 and persisting with numerous Atlantic storms battering the west coast and delivering high rainfall totals and significant flooding events across the SE, including our own River Mole and impacting Gatwick airport.  This blog covered numerous accounts of flooding and storm damage throughout that exceptionally stormy winter.

2015-01-06_21-37-02

UK rainfall anomaly 2014

In SE England and Reigate January and February 2014 were 260% and 274% wetter than average respectively (MetOffice).  Of the remaining months March, April, June, July, September and December were at or below average.  September in Reigate was particularly dry with only 18mm of rain, compared to the average annual SE total nearer 80mm. Nevertheless, despite these dry months for SE England 2014 was the 3rd wettest year on record, mainly due to the exceptional rain totals in the first 2 months.

2014 rainfall and pressure for Reigate

2014 rainfall and pressure for Reigate

From the rain chart below it is notable that for the second year running Friday is the wettest day of the week in Reigate, Fridays delivering 20% of our rain in 2014.  There have been studies showing that this effect of wet ends to the week is due to the build up of aerosol pollution during the commuting week.  This encourages the formation of condensation nucleii and higher rainfall totals on friday…it’s a theory worth pursuing because this is the second year running showing this effect in Reigate.  The other chart shows that southerly winds (SE-SW) brought most rain to Reigate in 2014.  This continues the trend from 2013 where southerly winds from SW to SE similarly accounted for the vast majority of rain arriving in Reigate.

2014 was the warmest year on record according to the Central England Temperature record stretching back to 1772.  The UK mean temperature for 2014 was 9.9C, 1.1C above the 1981-201 average and 1.47C above the longer term CET average.  The Reigate mean temperature for 2014 was 11.5C, with a max 30.2C (23/07) and min -2.9C (31/12).  The temperature record was broken by stealth and not by extreme values.  11 months of 2014 remained above the long term average.   4 months exceeded 2C above average, a further 7 months were above or very near 1C above average and only August dipped below courtesy of extra-tropical storm Bertha.  Extreme heat was mostly absent, as was extreme cold.  There was no snowfall in Reigate during 2014 and a notable absence of frost until some crisp days during December.

2014 warmest year on record

2014 warmest year on record

The annual ring chart below for Reigate also shows how August dipped significantly from the curve.  The rest of 2014 however was much warmer, resuming the upward temperature trend globally after the hiatus or temperature pause over the last 18 years.  Nevertheless, it wasn’t the warmest year for every part of the UK and a useful chart by Ed Hawkins (climate scientist Reading Uni @Ed_Hawkins http://www.met.reading.ac.uk/~ed/home/index.html ) reveals that parts of the UK had a cooler year than others and their warmest annual temperature record, technically, has yet to fall.

The animation below shows Europe bathed in above-average anomalous temperatures for the entire year, except momentarily dipping around August.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

2014 started stormy and windy.  The 3 month mean pressure charts below shows the mean pressure pattern during early 2014 and illustrates the air flow yielding our stormy and wet Jan and Feb: note the strong SW winds that result from the location of the LOW pressure in the Atlantic near Iceland up against the strong Azores high to the south creating a steep pressure gradient and resultant high winds.  This situation yielded a positive North Atlantic Oscillation which correlates with a warm, stormy wet winter. Contrast the winter chart with the rather slack flow of 2014 summer.  These are mean sea level pressure charts for those 3 months seasons.

The charts below show wind regime and gusts in Reigate during the year.  The highest gust of 52mph occured on 25 January.

In August the notable Ex-Hurricane Bertha, despite limited realtime impacts on the UK, delivered a sting in her tail by lowering temperatures across the UK in her wake by introducing a cooler-than-average NW flow for August.

Finally, Reigate had 1560 hours of sunshine in 2014.  2014 was a sunny year though not outstandingly so.  December was notably sunny for the time of year with over 100 hours of sunshine, over 160% more sunny than usual!

refs

http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/hadobs/hadukp/charts/hadukp_daily_plots.html

http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/climate/uk/summaries/2014/annual

2015-01-01_14-19-40

Reigate December 2014 (2013)

  • Tmax 12.7C (11.4)
  • Tmin -2.9C (-1.9)
  • Average temp 5.3C (5.8)
  • Total rainfall 49.4mm (CoCoRaHs) (110mm)
  • Max gust 38 mph (47)
  • Total sunshine 100 hours  (92.8 hours)
  • No snow

For Reigate and the whole of SE England, December 2014 was drier, warmer and sunnier than the long-term average (1961-90), but was it less windy than December 2013?

2015-01-05_17-52-33

In Reigate and for much of Southern England a HIGH pressure moved over to create a cool calm frosty end to the year with more sunshine than usual with a total exceeding 100 hours (92 hours 2013).  Rainfall was also less than usual for December at only 49.4mm (SE Dec average 96mm).  This was despite two low pressure systems this month labelled as “bombs” in the media.  Notably there was no snowfall recorded for Reigate in December and it maintained the warmer-than average theme making 2014 the warmest year on record for England, in the longest running continuous temperature record stretching all the way back to 1772 (more on this later).

2013 was remembered for being extremely stormy for good reason as gales and rain swept the UK through the winter period causing floods and travel chaos.  However, was December 2014 really so much less windy? One storm worthy of note struck this month but the weather “bomb” on the 12 December hardly caused a stir in the SE, with most of the impact being restricted to the NW of the country. The diminutive December max wind gust in Reigate of 38 mph was caused by the non-bomb LOW that sank SE across the UK that introduced the cold final days to 2014, the so-called “arrival of the queen of freezer”!

2015-01-01_15-07-49 december 2013-14 highest av wind speed

The chart above shows the daily highest average (10 minute) wind speed for each day through December 2013 (red line) and 2014 (blue line) as measured in Reigate. The chart shows that December 2013 seems to have started less windy than 2014 but caught up and finished on a more consistently breezy note.  Nevertheless, the difference is perhaps less than might be imagined considering the stormy label given to December 2013, though of course Reigate never experienced the highest gusts nationally which were reserved for coastal areas.  Nevertheless, equally surprising is that there were 14 days when average winds exceeded 10 mph in 2014 while only 11 days exceeded 10mph in the supposedly windy 2013.  The data for 20 mph starts to show the difference between 2013 and 2014: only 1 day exceeded 20 mph in Dec 2014 while 2 days exceeded 20 mph in 2013.

The data with respect to max wind gusts also confounds the idea that Dec 2013 was windier than Dec 2014.  The average maximum wind gust in Dec 2014 was 23 mph whereas the average maximum wind gust in Dec 2013 was 22 mph, no significant difference.  Of course, this all hides the crucial MAX GUST data (peak wind gust in 24 hours): but this doesn’t help either much because there were 18 days with max gusts exceeding 20 mph in 2014 while only 15 days exceeded 20 mph in 2013.  It is left to the absolute value for maximum wind gust to distinguish the two years because it is only in this category that December 2013 markedly exceed values in 2014 with 2013 max gust being 47 mph and 2014 just 38 mph. So it is these maximum gusts that people remember and associate with “storminess” because they do the damage, even if they are only brief moments in more average wind events.  On all the other data December 2014 was windier than 2013!  This also shows, of course, how different weather data can be used to illustrate different angles on a story.

  • Max Gust 2013 47 mph
  • Max Gust 2014 38 mph

It could be concluded that the collective memory of “severe weather” is often down to a few key events that raise public awareness, more than the weather itself.  There might also be thresholds which hit the news and chime with our collective severe weather memory: flooding and snow being the obvious triggers.  December 2013 was as much to do with heavy rain as it was to do with gales, especially for the sheltered inland areas of SE England.  Rainfall this December has certainly been lower than the long term average. The chart below shows the December precipitation average as 75mm for England and Wales and just 56mm for South East England, December 2014 in Reigate is lower still at 50mm, half as much as 2013.

 

So December 2014  has been an unremarkable month for Reigate and SE England although it was nearly as windy as 2013,  but it didn’t quite hit the extremes that make headlines!

More widely December caught the imagination as freezing weather sank south across Europe and the USA where huge snowfalls were recorded in Buffalo NY and in parts of the Alps.  It snowed in Algeria while Iceland experienced balmy December days as warm as 15C.  In the SE we were stuck under a very HIGH pressure (record breaking 1044mb) that gave us the sparkling final days in 2014 with pleasant winter sunshine and some cold temperatures as low as -7C in Redhill airport.  In Reigate our lowest temperature for December of -3C shows how a town location can ameliorate extreme temperatures.  Happy New Year!

2014-12-04_22-21-24

November 2014 in Reigate weather summary

Average temp 8.9C

Tmax 17.2C

Tmin  -0.5C

Total precipitation 135mm

Max gust 29mph (av wind speed 16mph)

Sunshine 87.5 hours

November weather in Reigate and the SE was rather dull and uneventful in Reigate but the meteorology going on more widely was fantastically interesting!

November was considerably warmer than average.  In the UK November turned out a whopping 2C warmer than the long term CET record.  In addition some areas in the south recorded 200% more rainfall than average.

Our anomalously warm and wet November was due to our weather being dominated by warm moist southerly winds as a trough sat in the Atlantic and a fairly strong blocking high dominated Russia and occasionally Scandinavia.  The northern hemisphere flow encouraged blocking further east and a trough to the west of the UK.

2014-11-12_19-27-35

The blocking high pushed LOW pressure in the Med that fed warm moist winds up to the UK (warm air advection).  Occasional Atlantic fronts caused heavy rain when cooler air on cold fronts advected in from the west to meet this moist flow.  Heavy November rain in the south was caused by this process.  Nevertheless, the usual scaremongering forecasts in the press failed to materialise.

A split jetstream assisted the warm moist feed across much of Europe and led to torrential rain and flooding along south facing coasts in Italy and S France.  To a lesser extent this also occurred in the UK with highest rainfall anomalies found in the south and SE.

Globally November was one of the warmest on record too.  However, the US and Canada recorded one of the earliest coldest and snowiest Novembers on record. The upper air patterns plunged cold Arctic air into North America and, when this frigid polar air crossed the warm Great Lakes, it produced tremendous falls of Lake Effect snow over northern New York State, especially around Buffalo.

Autumn for the UK as a whole was the third warmest in the record going back to 1910.  Autumnal rainfall was just a tad below average because September was a very dry month.  October and November were well above average for rainfall.  The SE came out average or just above average for rain for the whole of the Autumn.

http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/climate/uk/summaries/2014/autumn

Globally November’s warmth and climate extremes caused the climate change debate to reignite.  The graphs below speak for themselves.  Our November was dominated by our first HIGH ALTITUDE BALLOON launch. The experience of launching our first exploration into near space brought it home to us how thin our atmosphere is, how quickly it is to escape from and thus how fragile it is.  We live perilously close to utterly hostile environments… the views of Earth brought back from our stratospheric balloon were both sensational but somehow frightening in the context of rapid climate change on the only earth we have.

 

October 2014 rain and temperature

October 2014 rain and temperature

sunshine hours October 2014

sunshine hours October 2014

Reigate weather summary for October 2014

Tmax 22.6C

Tmin 2.4C

Taverage 13.1C

Total rainfall 112.3mm (CoCoRahs)

Despite memories of big storms like St Jude last year, October 2014 has turned out more than twice as wet with 112.3mm.  For the UK as a whole October 2014 was a warm month and broke records with the warmest “Halloween” on record.  At an average of 13.1C it was warm in Reigate as well, but oddly did not exceed the 2013 average of 14C. So 2014 was wetter but not quite as warm in Reigate as last year.  It was a quieter month with lower wind speeds and less widespread stormy conditions and it looks like Autumn 2014 will continue in this mild wet style but without the threat of big trains of countless Atlantic storms like last year.  Blocking HIGHS over Russia / Scandinavia and to the North look set to slow down the train of Atlantic weather and send it south into the Mediterranean where wet and stormy conditions have already been experienced (“Medicane” Mediterranean hurricane November Malta 2014)

In the UK as a whole October 2014 was the equal-tenth warmest October for the UK in a series since 1910 according to Central England temperatures (CET).  Globally, unconfirmed data suggests that October might be the warmest on record.

In Reigate much of the heaviest rain came in the first half of October in big convective downpours that were hit and miss.  Some tornadoes were reported across the UK and these were quite damaging in places further North.  We have yet to record a tornado in Reigate.  Tornados are extremely tricky to forecast but several agencies try it.. usually the MetOffice do not mention tornadoes in their forecasts because they are so hit and miss, even when potential is there.  Estofex, UKWW and SkywarnUK are agencies that have an eye on tornadic and severe weather conditions in the UK that RGSweather follows carefully.

MetOffice winter prediction 2014-15 as follows: It states “For November-December-January above-average UK-mean temperatures are more likely than below-average” and “Latest predictions for UK-mean precipitation favour near- or above-average rainfall for November-December-January”.  In contrast, other weather agencies and some seasonal model predictions are suggesting the possibility of a colder winter as various early indicators seem to suggest the possibility of incursions of cold air at times.  In particular, early October extensive Siberian snow cover, cooler than average temps over Siberia and a negative OPI index leading to an amplified jetstream (which seems to be occuring now) seem to suggest the possibility cold blasts at times this winter.  In addition, an Easterly phase of the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO) in the stratosphere favours a weaker flow of upper westerly winds that shut out cold air for the UK and W Europe.  An easterly QBO phase favours colder winters for us, but not always.  Whilst a strong El Nino has not transpired, there are indications that sea surface temperatures in the Pacific (especially central Pacific) are rising, albeit modestly: El Nino tends to link with cooler Euro winters.  These immediate measurable indicators correlating more or less with cold UK winters are interesting but not necessarily enough on their own to drive the atmopshere toward cold conditions.  They might, however, couple with other connections in the Stratosphere to cause stratospheric warming which, some weeks after, can cause downwelling of cold air into the troposphere and further disruption of the westerly flowing jetstream.  This is especially the case if warming is sudden (SST).  IF this all happens and IF surface pressure patterns play ball then the UK could see some cold snowy conditions! Charts below show some of these connections:

2014-10-02_20-39-59

September was a warm and unusually dry month.  Central England temperature (CET) came out officially as 15.1C which is 1.5C above the 30 year average (Hadcet) and made September the 4th warmest since 1910. In Reigate our average September temp was 16.5C, not unexpected as we are in the warmer SE of the country.  In 2013 the average for September was 14.4C but the range of temperature was greater: 2013 Tmax 30.9C and Tmin 4.6C were both more “extreme” than the respective Tmax 26.7C and Tmin 5.2C of 2014.  Whilst the remainder of Autumn looks to be cooling down markedly now, 2014 remains on target to be an exceptionally warm year overall.  Despite a cool August all the other months have been above average.

The UK average rainfall for September 2014 was 19.4mm for the month, the driest since 1910.  In Reigate we had 22mm of rain recorded (CoCoRahs) compared to over 47mm in 2013.  The rainfall we got in Reigate this September was restricted to a few heavy thundery showers: many of these moved over London and missed us completely.  However, a notable thunderstorm overnight on 19 Sept delivered some cracking thunder and lightning at about 1am and brought 10mm of rain in less than 20 minutes, and woke quite a few people up!

Overall, however, the month was dry: 16 consecutive days of no rainfall at all came early in the month and mostly dry days with just odd showers characterised the rest of the month.  Sunshine hours totalled 120 hours. Pictures below are a medley of photos from an “extreme” month due to the exceptionally dry conditions, the driest in 100 years in some places.  September in Reigate.

 

 

2014-09-06_08-16-25

August 2014 weather stats for Reigate, Surrey.

Tmax 27.2c (33.5c 2013)

Tmin 5.6c (9.7c 2013)

Average temp 16c (17.4c 2013)

Total rainfall (CoCoRahs) 84.4mm (37.6mm 2013)

Max gust 36 mph (Bertha 11 Aug)

GLOBALLY, August 2014 was the warmest on record (NASA, see below).  In contrast, August 2014 for the UK was the COOLEST August for 21 years since 1993 and rainfall was 156% above long term average in some places, including parts of the SE. In Reigate the average temp was 16C compared to 17.4c in 2013.  It was also wetter than usual, for example, twice as much rain fell Aug 2014 than in Aug 2013.  This ended a run of much warmer than average months throughout 2014.  The CET (Central England Temperature) is still seeing 2014 as one of the all-time warmest years even with a cooler August.

Arguably Ex-Hurricane Bertha “destroyed” the balmy UK summer of 2014.  She emerged out of the Tropical Atlantic early in the month and took aim at the UK.  Despite weakening extra-tropical storm Bertha still dragged some cool polar air into the UK and Europe behind her.

Bertha brought little direct disruption to Reigate and the SE but an impressive squall line moved across our region during the 10 Aug.  There was no especially extreme weather associated with the squall line (regrettably for weather folk!) but the cloud-scapes were magnificent as the squall moved away further to the East. Bertha did bring some unseasonably gusty weather and 36mph was recorded at our weather station on 11 August.  Winds in excess of 40mph were recorded locally higher up.

http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/climate/uk/summaries/2014/august

http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/climate/uk/summaries/2014/summer

Interestingly, NASA have just recorded August 2014 globally as the warmest ever August on record.  This shows how discrete locations on a regional scale can buck the global trend… obviously some places have warmer and colder weather than the global average and some of these anomalies could be potentially record breaking despite being the opposite extreme of the global mean.

http://www.climatecentral.org/news/nasa-globe-warmest-august-18031

 

 

2014-08-03_22-02-19

July summary for Reigate, Surrey

Tmax 30.2C on 23 July

Tmin 8.4C on & July

Total rainfall 31mm, with half of that falling during storms on 8 July.

Sunshine 201 hours

Max wind gust 28 mph on 26 July

July 2014 was notable for significant thunderstorms and a particularly spectacular meso-scale convective system (MCS) that drifted up from France and across the Channel on 18 July and then again on the 28 July with attendant shelf clouds and torrential rain and amazing lightning displays across much of the SE.  Whilst Reigate saw some thundery activity neither storm impacted significantly in Reigate, skirting further east, but did cause some spectacular lightning.  Flooding and hail was notable along the south coast, especially Brighton.  RGSweather was on holiday (typical!) so missed the action directly but will collect some links to add below. Any local photos available gratefully received.

http://www.surreymirror.co.uk/Thunderstorms-floods-perilously-close-Reigate/story-21947695-detail/story.html

http://www.surreymirror.co.uk/Video-pictures-Storms-Surrey-night/story-21657193-detail/story.html

http://www.severe-weather.eu/recent-events/spectacular-squall-line-over-the-english-channel-and-south-uk-july-18-2014/#more-7015